Tag Archives: Social Security

Social Security Eliminates Overpayment Burden for Social Security Beneficiaries

Automatic Overpayment Recovery Rate Reduced to 10 Percent

The Social Security Administration announced it will decrease the default overpayment withholding rate for Social Security beneficiaries to ten percent (or $10, whichever is greater) from 100 percent, significantly reducing financial hardship on people with overpayments.

“Social Security is taking a critically important step towards our goal of ensuring our overpayment policies are fair, equitable, and do not unduly harm anyone,” said Martin O’Malley, Commissioner of Social Security. “It’s unconscionable that someone would find themselves facing homelessness or unable to pay bills, because Social Security withheld their entire payment for recovery of an overpayment.”

 

Social Security to Remove Barriers to Accessing SSI Payments

Today, the Social Security Administration published a final rule, “Omitting Food from In-Kind Support and Maintenance (ISM) Calculations.” The final rule announces the first of several updates to the agency’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) regulations that will help people receiving and applying for SSI.

SSI benefits help pay for basic needs like rent, food, clothing, and medicine. People applying for and receiving SSI must meet eligibility requirements, including income and resource limits. Under our old rules, ISM includes food, shelter, or both a person receives – the agency counts ISM as unearned income, which may affect a person’s eligibility or reduce their payment amount.

Under the new final rule, beginning September 30, 2024, the agency will no longer include food in ISM calculations. The new policy removes a critical barrier for SSI eligibility due to an applicant’s or recipient’s receipt of informal food assistance from friends, family, and community networks of support. The new policy further helps in several important ways: the change is easier to understand and use by applicants, recipients, and agency employees; applicants and recipients have less information to report about food assistance received from family and friends, removing a significant source of burden; reducing month-to-month variability in payment amounts will improve payment accuracy; and the agency will see administrative savings because less time will be spent administering food ISM.

Beware Of The Latest Government Imposter Scam

Scammers claiming to be with the Social Security Administration

If you have watched the late night news over the past few years, you likely are aware that government imposter scams are skyrocketing. Since 2014 consumers have reported losses of more than $450 million as a result of these scams. In the first half of 2019, the Federal Trade Commission has received more than 200,000 complaints from people who were contacted by someone falsely claiming to be from the Social Security Administration, Internal Revenue Service or another governmental entity.

Scammers claiming to be with the Social Security Administration are the latest of these government imposters. One of the latest scams involves a call from someone purporting to be from Social Security, and falsely contending that your Social Security account has been frozen or compromised. The aim of these calls is to steal your money or your personal information. If you receive a call like this, you should hang up immediately.

What is the Best age to Start Social Security?

Have you ever wondered what the best time is to start collecting Social Security –
should you do it as soon as you turn 62? Or, does it make more sense to wait until your
“full retirement age” (either 65, 66 or 67, depending on when you were born)? Or, are
you better off waiting until age 70?
 
There’s a big financial advantage for those who wait. For each year past your full
retirement age that you can put off applying for Social Security, your monthly check will
increase by 8 percent.
 
For example, let’s say you aim to retire next month at 62, having worked 40 years and
ending up with a final salary of $80,000. Your benefit would come to around $1,455 a
month, according to Social Security’s website. But if you could wait and keep working
until 66, your full retirement age, you’d get $2,074 a month. And, if you can wait till age
70, your benefit would be $2,833 — almost double the check you would get at 62.